CHAPTER PLAQUES

FORT NISQUALLY

The John Work Prairie Project is an effort to recapture the original profile of the land near the Nisqually River delta to help illustrate what drew the Hudson’s Bay Company (HBC) to the area originally and caused them to build Fort Nisqually there.


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THE SAAR PIONEER CEMETERY

The Saar Pioneer Cemetery is named for former King County Councilman Peter Saar, who in 1873 buried his wife on a small hill on their homestead. Since that time the cemetery has been known by many names.

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WILKESON EAGLES BUILDING

On this Hundredth year of the Wilkeson Eagles Building we dedicate this plaque to all the Fraternal Orders that have called it home. We also want to recognize the past and present members of these groups that have helped preserve it in posterity

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The Historic Carbonado Saloon

During the peak mining years, Carbonado sported three taverns. But all the while, miners still brewed moonshine in the dense forests surrounding the town. Even though it was illegal to possess your own liquor or beer, the company knew they'd have a war on its hands if they prohibited it. Otherwise, if the miners and their families followed the Company’s rules, they were left alone.

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SPOKANE BRIDGE

The first bridge to cross the Spokane River was built here in 1864 by three partners - Joe Herring, Tim Lee, and Ned Jordan. The fee to cross the wooden trestle was a $1.00, and the bridge provided an opportunity for people and equipment to go into the gold and silver mines of Idaho, Montana, and British Columbia. Jim Lee was the first post master of Spokane Bridge, which became a pony express stop in 1871, between The Dalles, Oregon Territory and Missoula, Montana Territory.

 

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FORT NISQUALLY

The John Work Prairie Project is an effort to recapture the original profile of the land near the Nisqually River delta to help illustrate what drew the Hudson’s Bay Company (HBC) to the area originally and caused them to build Fort Nisqually there.

 

Traveling down the Puget Sound by canoe in 1832, HBC officer Archibald McDonald chose the grasslands near present day DuPont, Washington, as the location to establish an HBC fur trading outpost. McDonald’s instructions were to pick a site that held promise for future agricultural developments.

 

Early HBC maps referred to these open lands as “prairies” or “plains”. A more appropriate term for the grasslands of the southern Puget Sound would be “savannah” due to the presence of trees, most notably the Garry Oak which can still be seen growing in abundance along the Interstate 5 corridor.

 

The plants growing here at Fort Nisqually are native species that were well adapted to thrive in the gravelly soils deposited during the last glacial period about 11,500 years ago.

 

By the mid nineteenth century fur trade pursuits at Fort Nisqually had virtually ended. The surrounding expansive grasslands were well suited for open range herding of farm animals such as sheep and cattle. Fort Nisqually became headquarters for a subsidiary of the HBC called the Puget Sound Agricultural Company. The fort’s land claim would encompass more than 160,000 acres, a sizable portion of what is now southern Pierce County.

 

Named after prominent HBC gentleman John Work, this garden provides visitors a glimpse of the historic landscape where the original trading post was set.

 

Special thanks to Clint and Ruth Cannon for their generous donation that made construction of the John Work Prairie possible.

 

Erected 2015 by Doc Maynard Chapter No. 54-40, E Clampus Vitus.

 

Located at 47.3034° N, 122.5331° W

SAAR PIONEER CEMETERY

In 1873, former King County Councilman Peter Saar buried his wife on a small hill on their property thus beginning the first cemetery in the White River Valley. During the next 76 years approximately 200 people were buried at this site now called the Saar Pioneer Cemetery. It is surrounded on three sides by a Winco Foods parking lot and the fourth side is bounded by South 212th Street next to the Valley Freeway (State Hwy 167).

The Project

Saving Graves.com: "We believe that the willful desecration or destruction of human burial sites is unacceptable in a civilized society. All over the globe, cemeteries have been threatened by neglect, insufficient funds, inappropriate development, or insensitive public policy. These cemeteries constitute a memento of great achievements of the common everyday people that lived and worked there, contributing greatly to both culture and science, leading to the creation of a better place for those that followed. It is our primary objective to increase the awareness and highlight the importance of our historic cemeteries as sources of community and state pride, while promoting an attitude of reverence and respect, and encouraging the further preservation of these unique historical resources for future generations to appreciate and learn from. If society fails to appropriately and adequately deal with this issue through some definitive action, whether legislative or otherwise, not only will genealogical and historical resources likely be irreparably harmed, but society will potentially lose a valuable resource for charting its inexorable course into annals of human history."In the Fall of 2004 the South King County Genealogical Society voted to save the Saar Pioneer Cemetery from obscurity after an article was published in the Kent Reporter describing the horrible condition of this historic cemetery. At the next meeting I volunteered to be the Project Coordinator and I obtained written permission from the cemetery owner to restore the cemetery. Now here it is the Winter of 2014 and this will be the last column I write about this project.So much has been accomplished as you have read in this newsletter throughout these past ten years. Many major and many small work parties accomplished the arduous task of getting rid of the blackberries, ivy, underbrush, and trees that engulfed the majority of the cemetery. As you can see in the 'before' and 'after' photos a dramatic difference was made.BeforeAfterWhile spending so much time among the residents of the cemetery, I started to become curious - who are these people? An all-volunteer research team was formed to create a biographical book, and after six years of hard work A History of Saar Pioneer Cemetery And Its Inhabitants was published. A 4Culture grant paid for the first printing of 65 books and sales from that allowed a second printing of 35 more copies, of which all have been sold. All the profit was spent on the cemetery.Throughout the restoration project several artifacts have been uncovered. Barrel slats, several iron crosses, an ornate fence piece, a shovel head, iron fence poles, and broken pieces of headstones. All of these artifacts have been donated to the Greater Kent Historical Society's museum.The following have been added to the cemetery grounds by volunteer effort, grant money, SKCGS fundraisers, and community donations:City of Kent Landmark plaque. The South King County Genealogical Society and the Greater Kent Historical Society collaborated to have the cemetery named an historic landmark in 2010. The City of Kent obtained and installed the plaque.Civil War veteran replacement markers: New headstones were obtained for William Button, Elias Clark, Nathaniel Hoag, and Lewis Warren. The Department of Veteran's Affairs supplied all of these markers.

Mr. Button did not have any type of marker and his exact burial location is unknown. The White River Journal dated 15 June 1893 indicated that he was buried in the O'Brien Cemetery so he is indeed somewhere in this cemetery.

Mr. Clark's and Mr. Hoag's original military headstones were eroding and becoming unreadable. The new military markers were placed next to their burial site.

Mr. Warren's headstone was being consumed by a large maple tree. Fortunately the genealogical society transcribed this cemetery in 1979 before the front of the headstone became engulfed so we know who is buried there.

A Veterans Day ceremony will still be held each November to honor these soldiers. It is on the same day as the Auburn Veterans Day Parade; the parade in the morning and the Saar Cemetery event at three in the afternoon.E Clampus Vitus plaque. The 'Clampers' installed a plaque that indicates all of the different names that the Saar Pioneer Cemetery has been known by. It reads: "The Saar Pioneer Cemetery is named for former King County Councilman Peter Saar, who in 1873 buried his wife on a small hill on their homestead. Since that time the cemetery has been know by many names. Kent Cemetery; Kent Methodist Cemetery; M. E. Cemetery; Methodist Cemetery; Nelsons; O'Brien Cemetery; Peter Saar Cemetery; Peter Saar Memorial Cemetery; Pioneer Methodist Cemetery; Springbrook; Wilson's Corner. Plaque Dedicated 12 August 2010/6015 Ancient and Honorable Order of E. Clampus Vitus Doc Maynard Chapter No. 54-40 CREDO QUIA ABSURDUM."New markers were installed for: Caroline, Edith, and Johann Kasbaum; Mary and Hardin Lusk; Isaac and Nellie Parmenter; Benjamin Pittman; and Margaret Saar.

Caroline, Edith, and Johann Kasbaum's burial site was in terrible disarray. Johann's headstone was found in several pieces and Caroline's and Edith's headstones were completely gone. The pieces were put back together and new markers were engraved by hand by a dedicated volunteer, Mr. Kimsey Fowler.

Mary and Hardin Lusk's headstones went missing sometime between 1979 and 2004 so Mr. Fowler engraved new markers for them.

Isaac and Nellie Parmenter's new marker was recently installed by a family descendant, George Safadago, to fulfill a promise to his mother.

Benjamin Pittman died in 1907 and was buried without a marker. Exactly 100 years later, his great-granddaughter, Lois Pittman Traynor and her family, purchased a new marker for him.

Margaret Saar was the first to be interred in this property, her family's homestead. Her original headstone went missing sometime between 1979 and 2004, and the committee acquired a new stone to mark her resting place.

Recovered markers: Three original headstones were recovered and reinstalled: J.S.H. Johnson and his daughter, Julietta; and Ole C. Hoff.Unmarked Graves Monument. While researching everyone buried in this cemetery the research team kept coming across names of folks that were buried there, but had no headstone. The list of names came to a total of 89! It was impractical to try and make so many individual markers so one Unmarked Graves Monument was created so those 89 pioneers would not be forgotten.Many Saar Pioneer Cemetery residents' descendants, local companies, groups, community volunteers, tribal and government entities, friends and family have been very generous with their labor, resources, and donations. Without their involvement this cemetery would still be buried under a blanket of blackberries, ivy, underbrush, and trees - its inhabitants unknown and forgotten to the world.The owner of the cemetery, the Kent United Methodist Church, has recently hired a landscaper to regularly mow the grounds, and to keep the cemetery in good condition.I thank each and every person who was involved in this project.Respectfully submitted,

Karen Bouton

Retired Saar Cemetery Project Coordinator


South King County Genealogical Society

PO Box 582, Auburn, WA 98071-0582

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WILKESON EAGLES HALL

The Wilkeson Eagles #1409 was chartered back in 1906 with the Fraternal Order of Eagles.  The building that occupies the Wilkeson Eagles was built in 1910.  The building has also been home to many Fraternal organizations through its long history.  Those Organizations are as follows, The Order of Knights of Pythias, Pythian Sisters, Improved Order of Red Men, Degree of Pocahontas (Auxiliary of Red Men), Independent Order of Odd Fellows, Rebekah Lodges (Auxiliary of Odd Fellows), Independent Order of Foresters, Ancient Order of Druids, and Knights of the Mystic Lights.  The Wilkeson Eagles #1409 is located in Wilkeson, Wa, a small mining, logging, and sandstone quarry town nestled in the foothills of Mt Rainier which has a population of about 500 people.  The Wilkeson Eagles proudly supports many causes in the local community and national charities through fundraisers and helping our neighbors with a hands on approach.  We are a proud group that have always stood out from the crowd of any other fraternal organization in the nation that has a long tradition of history here in Wilkeson.  We are also proud that we now have a Women's Auxiliary that is part here at the Wilkeson Eagle family.

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CARBONADO SALOON

THE HISTORIC CARBONADO SALOON

This structure was a close relative to the Carbon Hill Coal Company’s brick store that sat directly across from it on Pershing Avenue. Right around 1880, this building held Carbonado’s first Post Office. It’s known that a barber shop once inhabited a corner and a dentist hung his shingle here. The “Company” owned the whole shebang, including all the homes and the “Canteen,” which was the first watering hole in town. Miners’ paychecks came in the form of script. Your rent was deducted from your weekly pay and whatever was left could be spent at the Company Store or the “Canteen.” Many times miners found themselves financially in the hole, hence the song

“I Owe My Soul to the Company Store."


During the peak mining years, Carbonado sported three taverns. But all the while, miners still brewed moonshine in the dense forests surrounding the town. Even though it was illegal to possess your own liquor or beer, the company knew they'd have a war on its hands if they prohibited it. Otherwise, if the miners and their families followed the Company’s rules, they were left alone.

 

Carbonado’s mines petered out during the Great Depression, while the coal company called it quits in 1937. The homes were sold off, and the Canteen continued to operate thru private hands. In the 1940’s and 50’s, bottled and canned beer were sold to the adults and there was a Coca Cola cooler and candy counter for the children. Later on, draft beer came to Carbonado and in the 1990’s, hard liquor made its appearance on the back bar.

 

The “Canteen,” later known as the “Tavern” and now the “Carbonado Saloon,” has been quenching the thirst of locals and visitors alike for more than 130 years. A town that once boasted one of the biggest mining operations on the Pacific Coast, is now one of the smallest incorporated towns in the State of Washington.

 

Erected 2012 by Doc Maynard Chapter No. 54-40, E Clampus Vitus.

 

Located at 47° 4.615′ N, 122° 3.342′ W

 

Special thanks to Jon and Amber Pries, owners of the Carbonado Saloon for their support of the Doc Maynard Chapter of ECV. 

SPOKANE BRIDGE

Imagine yourself floating down the Spokane River from the head waters of the Coeur d’Alene River. After passing through the gorge at Post Falls the river widens and you meander through the Spokane valley. Pioneers began settling this area in the 1850s.

 

The first pioneer, Antoine Plante, arrived in 1852. Plante married an Indian woman and had three children. He took up farming in the summer and trapping in the winter to provide for his family.

 

The first bridge to cross the Spokane River was built here in 1864 by three partners - Joe Herring, Tim Lee, and Ned Jordan. The fee to cross the wooden trestle was a $1.00, and the bridge provided an opportunity for people and equipment to go into the gold and silver mines of Idaho, Montana, and British Columbia. Jim Lee was the first post master of Spokane Bridge, which became a pony express stop in 1871, between The Dalles, Oregon Territory and Missoula, Montana Territory.

 

In 1881 the Northern Pacific Railroad arrived in Spokane Falls, which later became Spokane. Railroad tracks were not extended to the Puget Sound area till 1893 giving the Spokane a ten year head start on delivering goods -- such as lumber, gold, silver, and produce -- to markets in the east.

 

Over the years many business came and went in the area, one of which was the Cranston Box Manufacturing Co. Built in 1913, the box company filled, on average, a dozen railroad cars full of box shooks per week. These were thin wide boards for building fruit boxes.

 

Rockin’ B Ranch

 

The first owner of the Rocking B Ranch was Mr. Joseph Humphreys, who came to the area in 1908.

Mr. Humphreys and his wife established a farm on the property, and built a cabin. They later built a big house for his family, and the cabin became a bunkhouse for travelers. Mrs. Humphreys was famous for her apple pie.

 

The Humphreys sold the property in 1960 to the Dinnison family. Mr. Dinnison tore down all the out buildings and built one large barn in 1966, where they kelp 50 horses -- from Sheltons to American saddle bred horses. Mr. And Mrs. Dinnison divorced in 1966 and the property changed hands a few times afterward.

 

Scott and Pamela Brownlee bought the property in 1992. The Brownlees met at the Dick Grove Music School near Los Angeles Ca in 1979, and had married in 1981 Pamela worked as a backup singer for various recording artists, and Scott operated a recording studio where he was among the first digital audio recorders in the country

 

The Brownlees turned the ranch into one of the areas favorite destinations for residents and tourists.

In 1993 they hosted the ranch's first barn concert, which attracted 500 guests - mostly friends and members of their church. Later concerts were such a hit that they opened it up to the public in 1995 as

The Rockin' B Ranch Cowboy Supper Show.